Excel Tutorial: How To Calculate Percentage Of A Number In Excel

Introduction


Understanding how to calculate percentages in Excel is an essential skill for anyone working with numbers and data. Whether you need to analyze sales figures, track financial performance, or simply want to understand the impact of certain values, being able to quickly and accurately calculate percentages in Excel can save you time and provide valuable insights. In this Excel tutorial, we will provide an overview of the steps to calculate the percentage of a number in Excel, making it easier for you to perform this important task with confidence.


Key Takeaways


  • Understanding how to calculate percentages in Excel is essential for data analysis and financial tracking.
  • Knowing the basic percentage formula and how to apply it in Excel is important for accurate calculations.
  • Using cell references in the formula allows for dynamic and efficient percentage calculations.
  • Customizing formatting options for percentages in Excel can help display data in a clear and impactful way.
  • Practicing techniques for calculating multiple percentages at once can improve efficiency and accuracy in Excel.


Understanding the basic formula


When working with Excel, it is important to understand how to calculate percentages of a number. This is a useful skill for various financial and data analysis tasks. The basic formula for calculating percentage in Excel is essential to know in order to perform this task accurately.

A. Introduction to the basic percentage formula in Excel

The basic formula for calculating percentage in Excel is:

=(part/whole)*100

Where:

  • Part: The specific number you want to find the percentage of, also called the "part".
  • Whole: The total or complete number that the "part" is being compared to, also called the "whole".

B. Explanation of each component of the formula (i.e. part/whole)

The "part" refers to the specific number for which the percentage is being calculated. This could be a sales figure, a budget amount, or any other specific value within a larger set of data.

The "whole" represents the total or complete number that the "part" is being compared to. This could be the total sales for the year, the overall budget, or any other complete data set that the "part" is a part of.


Applying the basic formula in Excel


Calculating the percentage of a number in Excel is a simple process that can be achieved using a basic formula. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to do it:

  • Step-by-step guide on how to input the formula in a cell


    To calculate the percentage of a number, you can use the formula: = (part / total) * 100. For example, if you want to calculate 20% of 150, you can input the formula as = (20 / 150) * 100 in a cell.

    To input the formula in a cell, select the cell where you want the result to appear, then type the formula into the formula bar at the top of the Excel window. Press Enter, and the calculated percentage will appear in the cell.

  • Tips on formatting the cell to display the percentage correctly


    Once the percentage is calculated, you can format the cell to display the result as a percentage. To do this, select the cell containing the calculated percentage, then go to the 'Number' tab in the Excel ribbon. From the drop-down menu, select 'Percentage' to format the cell as a percentage.

    Additionally, you can adjust the number of decimal places displayed by clicking the 'Increase Decimal' or 'Decrease Decimal' button in the 'Number' tab. This will allow you to control the precision of the percentage displayed in the cell.



Using cell references in the formula


When calculating the percentage of a number in Excel, using cell references can make your calculations more dynamic and easier to update. By using cell references for the part and whole in the formula, you can change the values in the referenced cells and instantly see the updated percentage.

A. Explanation of using cell references for the part and whole in the formula


Cell references allow you to refer to the value in a specific cell in your worksheet. When calculating the percentage of a number, you can use cell references to automatically update the percentage when the values in the referenced cells change.

  • Part: Using a cell reference for the part of the percentage formula allows you to easily update the value without having to modify the formula. For example, if the part of the percentage changes from 50 to 75, you can simply update the value in the referenced cell, and the percentage calculation will automatically adjust.
  • Whole: Similarly, using a cell reference for the whole in the percentage formula allows you to update the total value without editing the formula. This can be helpful when the total value changes, as the percentage will automatically reflect the new value.

B. Examples of how cell references can be used for dynamic calculations


Let's take a look at a couple of examples to illustrate how cell references can be used for dynamic percentage calculations.

  • Example 1: Suppose you have a sales report with the total sales in cell A1 and the target sales in cell A2. You can use the formula =A1/A2 to calculate the percentage of target sales achieved. By using cell references, you can easily update the total and target sales values, and the percentage will automatically adjust.
  • Example 2: In a student's gradebook, the formula =B2/B$10 can be used to calculate the percentage score of a student in a particular assignment, where B2 refers to the student's score and B$10 refers to the total marks for the assignment. Using cell references in the formula allows for quick updates to the scores and total marks, with the percentage updating accordingly.


Formatting options for percentages


When working with numbers in Excel, it is important to be able to display percentages in a clear and understandable way. There are several formatting options available in Excel to achieve this.

A. Overview of the different formatting options for displaying percentages in Excel
  • Percentage format:


    This is the standard percentage format in Excel, which displays numbers as percentages with two decimal places. It is commonly used for general percentage calculations.
  • Fraction format:


    This format displays percentages as fractions, which can be useful for presenting percentages in a different way.
  • Custom format:


    Excel also allows users to create custom number formats, which can be used to display percentages in a specific way, such as including text or symbols.

B. How to customize the percentage formatting to suit specific needs
  • Changing decimal places:


    By adjusting the decimal places in the percentage format, users can control the level of precision in their percentage displays.
  • Adding symbols or text:


    Custom formats can be used to add symbols, such as a percentage sign, or text to the percentage display to make it more visually appealing or to provide additional context.
  • Conditional formatting:


    Excel's conditional formatting feature can be used to apply different formatting to percentages based on specific conditions, such as highlighting percentages above or below a certain threshold.


Calculating multiple percentages at once


When working with a large dataset in Excel, it can be time-consuming to calculate percentages for each individual cell. Fortunately, there are techniques and functions available that allow you to apply the percentage formula to multiple cells at once.

Techniques for applying the percentage formula to multiple cells


  • Using the fill handle: One of the easiest ways to apply the percentage formula to multiple cells is by using the fill handle. Simply enter the formula in the first cell, then click and drag the fill handle (located in the bottom right corner of the cell) across the range of cells where you want the formula to be applied.
  • Using the drag-and-drop method: Another method is to use the drag-and-drop method. After entering the formula in the first cell, click on the cell to select it, then position the cursor over the bottom right corner of the cell until it turns into a black cross. Click and drag the formula across the range of cells where you want it applied.
  • Using the paste special function: If you have already calculated the percentage in one cell and want to apply it to multiple cells, you can use the paste special function. Copy the cell with the calculated percentage, then select the range of cells where you want the formula to be applied. Right-click, choose "Paste Special," then select "Formulas" and click "OK."

Using absolute and relative cell references for efficient calculation


  • Absolute cell references: When creating a percentage formula in Excel, you may need to refer to a specific cell that should not change when the formula is used in other cells. In this case, you can use an absolute cell reference by adding a dollar sign ($) before the column letter and row number (e.g., $A$1). This ensures that the cell reference does not change when the formula is copied to other cells.
  • Relative cell references: On the other hand, if you want the cell references in the formula to change based on its new location in other cells, you can use relative cell references. In this case, you do not need to add the dollar sign before the column letter and row number, allowing the reference to adjust when copied to other cells.


Conclusion


Understanding how to calculate percentages in Excel is crucial for anyone working with data. Whether you're a student, a small business owner, or a data analyst, knowing how to calculate percentages can be a powerful tool for making informed decisions. By following the techniques outlined in this tutorial, you can master the art of percentage calculation in Excel.

Remember, the key to mastering any skill is practice. So, don't hesitate to open up Excel and start experimenting with different formulas to calculate percentages. The more you practice, the more confident you'll become in using this valuable feature of Excel.

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